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Eurydice

EACEA National Policies Platform:Eurydice
Administration and governance at local and/or institutional level

Malta

2.Organisation and governance

2.7Administration and governance at local and/or institutional level

Last update: 9 July 2023

Administration and governance at local and/or institutional level

Institutions having autonomy in their ethos, identity and administration (including recruitment, entry-requirements) are listed hereunder:

Nonstate actors in the provision of childcare 

Non-state childcare centres (be they privately-run or run by a religious order) are regulated by the Directorate for Quality and Standards in Education (DQSE) in line with the  National Standards, Early Childhood Education and Care Services (0-3 Years). In line with the Standards, each childcare centre is run by a Manager. Independent childcare centres have voluntarily formed the Childcare Centre Providers Association, to discuss and represent providers in matters of mutual interest.

State actors in the provision of kindergarten and compulsory education

Since September 2005, all state schools in Malta form part of one of ten College Networks, where each College Network is a body corporate with its own legal and distinct personality, although forming part of the Department for Education Services. Each College is led by a Head of College Network who facilitates the whole network and can take decisions concerning the schools within the College Network. The Head of College Network is appointed by the Minister responsible for Education on the basis of a definitive and renewable contract, with a selection process, following a public call. 

Each school is managed by its own Head of School, the Educational and Operational Leader of the respective school’s community, responsible for ensuring a high quality and equitable educational provision which meets the diverse needs of all learners. The Head of School is supported by Assistant Heads, whose core responsibility is to assist and deputise for the Head of School by undertaking professional and administrative duties and fostering a climate of genuine collegiality amongst community members, setting the pace through active engagement in the development of a Community of Professional Educators, including through School Development Planning. The number of Assistant Heads in a school is commensurate with the school population.

Every College has a Consultative Board appointed by the Minister for Education, composed of not less than five, but not more than seven members who shall be appointed for three years, and may be reappointed for further terms. The Board has the function of supporting the College, to acquire the services and the resources required for the implementation of its functions, and to monitor that these functions are being performed.

School Heads within a College form part of the Council of Heads (COH), which is chaired by the Head of College Network. The main aim of the Council of Heads is to nurture a spirit of collegiality in the running of the College as a network of schools, while developing a common ethos and identity. This system ensures that students entrusted to the schools within the College Network receive their educational entitlement according to their potential in a full, continuous and smooth process of education. 

Each public school has a school council made up of parents, students (when they are 16 years of age or older) and teachers who work together to improve the school environment and to make school a better place where students can be educated in a holistic manner. Members sitting on school councils are selected by regular School Council elections held every two years. The role of school councils is a consultative one to the school’s senior management team.

Nonstate actors in the provision of kindergarten and compulsory education

Non-state schools must follow the National Curriculum Framework and are regulated and licensed by the Directorate for Quality and Standards in Education (DQSE). Like State Schools, non-State schools are led by a Head of School, the Educational and Operational Leader of the respective school’s community, with the aim of ensuring a high quality and equitable educational provision which meets the diverse needs of all learners. The Head of School is supported by Assistant Heads, the core responsibility of whom is to assist and deputise for the Head of School by undertaking such professional and administrative duties and fostering a climate of genuine collegiality amongst community members, setting the pace through active engagement in the development of a Community of Professional Educators, including through School Development Planning. Independent schools are owned and run by individuals or Foundations and receive no government funding for operations. Some independent schools voluntarily joined the Independent Schools Association, through which matters of mutual interest are discussed and presented to government.

Church schools receive government funding for operations and are supported by the Secretariat for Catholic Education in terms of administrative (including admissions), curricular and psycho-social support. The Secretariat falls under the Maltese Episcopal Conference and is also answerable to the Conference of Major Maltese Superiors. Church schools have also voluntarily formed a Church Schools Association (CSA) to offer professional and moral support to its members so that they may provide the best possible holistic Catholic education to all students who attend Church schools.

Nonstate actors in Further and Higher Education

In October 2022, there were 149 independent licensed further/higher education institutions, the full list of which can be found here. All further and higher education are regulated by the Malta Further and Higher Education Authority (MFHEA) by virtue of the Further  and  Higher Education Act. A further and higher education institution can be licensed as one of the following:

1.    University – Provided it meets the criteria established article 47 (1) of Subsidiary Legislation 607.03.

2.    Higher Education Institution – If they deliver programmes or modules that have been formally accredited at MQF Level 5 or higher.

3.    Further Education Institution – If they deliver programmes or modules leading to a qualification pegged at MQF Levels 1 to 4.

4.    Further and Higher Education Institution – If they deliver programmes leading to qualifications pegged at Levels 1 to 8.

5.    Further Education Centre – An individual only offering foreign qualifications up to MQF Level 4.

6.    Tuition Centre – Centres which offer courses that are not mapped to the MQF.

Providers providing the following types of programmes do not require a licence by the MFHEA:

(a) short programmes  or  courses  which  lead  to  a certificate of attendance;

(b) continuous professional development programmes or courses which are  regulated  by  professional accreditation bodies;

(c) any type  of  programme  which  does  not  purport  to serve for obtaining a qualification classified within the Malta  Qualifications  Framework  or  a  recognised foreign qualifications framework;

(d) programmes developed and provided by a company for proprietary purposes, or provided by other bodies or entities on its behalf, and for exclusive use within that company, which proprietary  purposes  shall  be reflected in the name of the certificate or other type of award  obtained upon  successful  completion  of  that programme.

 

Three state-funded further and higher institutions were granted self-accrediting status, within certain limits, which gives them sole responsibility for programme quality assurance:

 

Institution

Provider type

Law

Fee status for Home students

MQF level/s provided

Regulation status

MCAST

State

Education Act (Chapter 327 of the laws of Malta)

Full-time courses are free of charge; Part-time courses include fees

1-8

Self-Accrediting (up to MQF7)

Institute for Tourism Studies

State – Ministry for Tourism

Education Act (Chapter 327 of the laws of Malta)

Full-time courses are free of charge; Part-time courses include fees

2-6

Self-Accrediting (up to MQF5)

University of Malta

Parastatal

Education Act (Chapter 327 of the laws of Malta)

Full-time courses leading to a qualification at MQF6 or to a qualification leading to a professional warrant are free of charge; Other courses include fees

5-8

Self-accrediting (all levels)